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Rock Cycle Poster

Your Rock Cycle Poster Must Include a Drawn Diagram of the Rock Cycle with the Correct Labels for each Rock Type and Process.

Must Explain and Describe the Three Rock Types: Metamorphic, Sedimentary and Igneous.

Must Explain and Describe the Processes that Rocks Undergo to Change into different Rock Types, Form or Sediments: Melting, Cooling & Hardening, Weathering & Erosion, Heat & Pressure, Compacting & Cementing

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Earth’s Layers Poster

Create a Graphic Organizer Informational Poster that Displays the Earths Compositional Layers: Inner Core, Outer Core, Mantle and Crust.

The Poster must also Display the Earth’s Physical Layers: Lithosphere, Asthenosphere, Mesosphere, Outer Core and Inner Core.

The Poster must also explain with written texts all of the parts of the Earth’s Compositional Layers and Physical Layers.

The Poster must also answer the EQ: How can the Physical and Compositional Layers of Earth be Described and Compared?

 

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Unit 6 Unit Summary & Benchmark Review

1. In a flashlight, chemical energy side a battery is changed into electrical energy, then to light energy and thermal energy.  The law of conservation of energy states that these energy conversions do not create or destroy energy.

2. Insulators transfer energy in the form of heat slowly.  Conductors transfer energy in the form of heat quickly.

3. The particles in the glass vibrate in place more rapidly because they have more kinetic energy.

4. No, the thermometer measures the average kinetic energy of particles in a substance, while thermal energy s the sum of the kinetic energy of the particles.

(1) B (2) H (3) B (4) I (5) B (6) F (7) C (8) G (9) A (10) F (11) C (12) G

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Unit 6 Lesson 3 Review

1. Energy transferred from hot objects to cold objects.

2. The kinetic energy of all particles in an object.

3. The transfer of heat through direct touching.

4. The transfer of heat by moving convection currents.

5. The transfer of heat by electromagnetic waves.

6. Temperature is the average kinetic energy of the particles in a substance, whereas heat is the energy that is transferred from objects at a higher temperature to objects at a lower temperature.  Heat can change the temperature of an object.

7. Heat is transferred between the two objects until they reach the same temperature.

8. A = Conduction.  B = Radiation.  C = Convection.

9.  Temperature is the average kinetic energy of particles in an object.  Thermal energy is the total kinetic energy of particles in an object.  Heat is the energy transferred between objects due to temperature differences.

10.  No, the particles in a solid can’t move freely, so the can’t change places as different areas become more or less dense.

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Unit 6 Lesson 2 Review

1. The kinetic theory of matter says that the particles that make up matter are constantly in motion.  The average kinetic energy of those moving particles is how temperature is measured.

2. A thermometer is used to measure temperature and is often marked in degrees.

3. Temperature measures the average kinetic energy of the particles that make up a substance.

4. Higher

5. Celsius = degrees Celsius.  Fahrenheit = degrees Fahrenheit.  Kelvin = kelvins.

6. A.  The particles are moving faster and thus have a higher kinetic energy.

7. The particles would, on average, slow down.  The particles would, on average, speed up.

8. 98.6 degrees Celsius is much hotter than 98.6 degrees Fahrenheit.  A human would not be able to survive at that temperature.  Doctors worry more about a fever of a few degrees Celsius because the difference between degrees in the Celsius scale is much higher than the difference between degrees in the Fahrenheit scale.

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Unit 6 Lesson 1 Review

1. The total amount of energy in a closed system always remains the same.

2. A comparison between a conversion’s useful output energy to the input energy.

3. Nuclear energy comes from changes in the nucleus of a atom.  Light energy travels in waves called electromagnetic waves.

4. The chemical energy in a battery is converted into electrical energy that powers a flashlight.

5. The electrical energy in a light bulb is converted into light energy.  Unfortunately, it is also converted into heat energy.

6. (45 J/120 J) x 100% = 37.5%

7.  The cheering of the crowd.  The chemical energy of the food the jumper ate.  The jumper soaring through the air.

8.  The chemical energy of the jumper’s food is converted into mechanical energy as he move.  His kinetic energy is converted into potential energy as he jumps.

9. Electromagnetic energy from the sun is converted into chemical energy by plants.  When you eat a plant, you take in this chemical energy.  You convert the chemical energy into kinetic energy when you move your body.

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Unit 5 Unit Summary & Benchmark Review

Summary

1. Wavelength or frequency affects the energy of waves.

2. Yes.  Ultraviolet light is not visible, but it behaves similarly to visible light.

3. The energy of a gamma ray is higher than the energy of a microwave.  The wavelength of a gamma ray is smaller than the wavelength of a microwave.

4. A radio wave is a transverse wave.

Benchmark Review

(1) C  (2) G  (3) C  (4) H  (5) B  (6) G  (7) A  (8) F  (9) C  (10) F  (11) A  (12) G

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Unit 5 Lesson 4 Review

1. Translucent

2. Transparent

3. Reflection

4. Refraction

5. Scattering

6. 6a = transparent. 6b = translucent. 6c = opaque. 6d = opaque.

7. Foil

8. The plastic lunchbox.

9. A mirror’s surface does not transmit any light (it reflects all the light) so it is opaque.  You cannot see objects behind the mirror.

10. A black surface absorbs more light than a white surface.  The light is converted to thermal energy, making the black surface hotter.

11. Particles in the air scatter blue light more than other colors of light.  As a result, blue light seems to be coming from every direction in the sky.

12.  The blue light will bend the most because it has the shortest wavelength.  The red light will bend the least because it has the longest wavelength.

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Unit 5 Lesson 3 Review

1. Electromagnetic radiation

2. Electromagnetic spectrum

3. Infrared

4. A vibrating electric and magnetic field moving through space.

5. Highest frequency = gamma rays.  Lowest frequency = radio waves.

6. All EM waves travel at the same speed, the speed of light, in a vacuum.

7. The opera stations signals have lower frequency, and so they have a longer wavelength.

8. The rock and roll station’s signals have higher frequency, so they have more energy than the other station’s.

9. Radio wave

10. Either X-ray or gamma ray.

11. White light is light that contains all colors (frequencies) of visible light equally.

12. The device should be placed on a satellite in orbit, because if it were on the ground, the atmosphere would block too much of the x-ray light.

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Unit 5 Lesson 2 Review

1. D

2. A

3. E

4. C

5. B

6. Amplitude

7. Frequency and period are inverses.  Frequency = 1/period.

8. Frequency and amplitude.

9. In a vacuum, all EM waves travel at the speed of light.

10. 6 m

11. 3 m/s

12. 2 s

13. Each wavefront expands in a sphere, spreading the energy across a larger area.

14. Colder air is denser, sound is a mechanical wave, and mechanical wave speed depends on the density of the medium in which it travels.  So sound will travel slower in colder air.

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Unit 5 Lesson 1 Review

1. Energy

2. Longitudinal

3. Mechanical

4. Water

5. Rock or Earth

6. Air

7. You can make a transverse wave on a rope by shaking one end up and down while the other end is fixed.  As the wave moves down the rope, pieces of the rope vibrate up and down.

8. The sun’s rays must be electromagnetic waves because they travel through empty space to reach Earth.

9. EM waves travel as disturbances in electric and magnetic fields.

10. There is no air in the jar; the inside of the jar is a vacuum.

11.Light waves are electromagnetic waves.  They can travel through a vacuum.

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Science Olympiad Resources for Anatomy and Physiology Team

1-RESPIRATION

2-RESPIRATORY_SYSTEM

3-RESPIRATORY_SYSTEM2

4-RESPIRATORY_SYSTEM3

5-THE_RESPIRATORY_SYSTEM

6-THE_RESPIRATORY_SYSTEM2

7-THE_RESPIRATORY_SYSTEM3

https://www.soinc.org/anatomy-and-physiology-c

https://www.wiley.com/college/apcentral/anatomydrill/

http://www.indiana.edu/~anat215/virtuallab/index.html

https://www.getbodysmart.com/

http://glencoe.mheducation.com/sites/dl/free/0078757134/383958/BL_21.html

https://www.soinc.org/sites/default/files/uploaded_files/2018_RESPIRATORY_SYSTEM_HANDOUT.pdf

https://www.soinc.org/sites/default/files/uploaded_files/2018_IMMUNE_SYSTEM_HANDOUT.pdf

https://www.soinc.org/sites/default/files/uploaded_files/2018_OVERVIEW_DIGESTIVE_SYSTEM_HANDOUT.pdf

https://www.soinc.org/sites/default/files/uploaded_files/18_A%26P_SAMPLE_YR3.pdf

2018_A_P_YR3

https://scioly.org/wiki/index.php/Anatomy_and_Physiology

https://www.soinc.org/anatomy-and-physiology-c

 

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Science Olympiad Resources for Solar System Team

Resources

Analemma

H-R 03 Grid

Lunar Explorer [B-Div]

The Solar System [B-Div]

Solar System

Competitions

2002 N. CO Regional Exam

2004_penn_state_astro_answr_key

2004_penn_state_astro_quest_response

2006 Solar System Answer Key

2006 Solar System Exam

Analemma

Lunar Explorer

Ohio State Div B Exam Intro

Part II 03 Exam

Part II 03 Response Sheet

Planet 03 Grid

Planet Grid 03 Key

Pt II 03 Answer Key

Solar System Practice Questions

Solar System- Answer Key

Solar System- Response Sheet

Solar System-2006 Exam

2010-NSO-Final-Exam-Studentanalemma_ans_key

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Science Olympiad Resources for Metrology Team

Resources

2017 MTCD-FINAL-2

METEOROLOGY SEVERE STORMS-PDF

SAMPLE STUDY QUESTIONS

Climate [B Div]

CLIMATE WORKSHEET

MeteorVocab

MeteorVocabActivity

Sun Distance

Sunspots Answer Key

The Sun

Competitions

METARtestandkey

Meteorology_Test_3

Meteorologystationactivity

MeteorologyTest1

Meteorologytest1answers

MetTest2

MetTest2answers

MetTest4

MetTest4answers

Mettest5

Mettest5answers

VA_Division_B_VASO_Meteorology_Test_2009_Regional_Answer_Key

VA_Division_B_VASO_Meteorology_Test_2009_Regional_Student’s_Answer_form

VA_Division_B_VASO_Meteorology_Test_2009_Regional

 

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Science Olympiad Resources for the Ecology Team

Ecology Study Guide

2018_ECOLOGY_0

2018 Biomes are North American Grasslands and Desserts

Dessert Study Guides

D-SEMI ARID BIOMES

DESERT COMMUNITIES

NORTH AMERICAN DESERTS 1

NORTH AMERICAN DESERTS 2

PRE DESERTS OF NORTH AMERICA

SONORA DESERT

SONORAN DESERT BACKGROUND

THE DESERT BIOME

North American Grasslands Study Guide

GRASSLAND-STEPPE

PRARIE GRASSLANDS

PRARIE PRIMER

TALLGRASS PRARIE ECOSYSTEM

THE GRASSLAND BIOME 1

THE GRASSLAND BIOME 2

THE GRASSLAND BIOME 3

Resources

1-INTRO_ ECOLOGY

2-EcologyNotes

3-EcologyNotes2

4-Population & Community Ecology

5-COMMUNITY_ECOLOGY

6-Ecosystems & Biosphere

7-EcologicalConcepts&Issues

8-Conservation & Biodiversity

9-SUSTAINING_ECOSYSTEMS

10-Practice Questions-Ecology-w-Answers

11-provincial-exams-ecology

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Hear Ye, Hear Ye! Congratulations to All of the Science Olympians!

Congratulations to Abigail Williams, Daniela Riewold,  Andres Zatizabal, Hannah Duckwitz, and Michael McKnight for being a part of the team.

We will practice everyday, Monday to Friday, for four weeks in preparation for the Science Olympiad on Saturday, Feb. 3, 2018 at the Hillsborough Community College at the Brandon Campus.

Practice time is from 1:50 – 3:15 After School, Monday to Friday.

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Hear Ye, Hear Ye! Calling All Potential and Interested Science Olympians!

Please email me over the Holiday Break if you are interested.  I will be selecting the team based on Test Scores, Class Grades and Teacher Recommendations.  For those who are chosen, you will receive an email from me during break, and then we will meet in my Room (2nd Floor #222) on January 9, 2018 at 2:00 to 4:00.  We will practice everyday, Monday to Friday, for three weeks in preparation for the Science Olympiad on Saturday, Feb. 3, 2018 at the Hillsborough Community College at the Brandon Campus.

MY EMAIL

spwillia@pasco.k12.fl.us

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Energy Packet

Light Waves

What is increasing?

>THE WAVELENGTH

<WAVESPEED AND FREQUENCY

Light Waves Pg. 1

  1. GAMMA RAYS
  2. X-RAYS
  3. ULTRAVIOLET
  4. VISIBLE LIGHT
  5. INFRARED RADIATION
  6. MICROWAVES
  7. SHORT RADIO WAVES
  8. LONG RADIO WAVES

Uses of Light Waves Pg. 2

  • GAMMA RAYS

-TREATS SOME CANCER

-USED TO KILL GERMS

 

  • X-RAYS

-SHOWS BREAKS IN BONES

-SHOWS CAVITIES IN TEETH

 

  • ULTRAVIOLET

-CAUSES A SUNBURN

-CREATES A TAN

 

  • VISIBLE LIGHT

-ALLOWS US TO SEE

-CREATES A RAINBOW

 

  • INFRARED RADIATION

-SHOWS HEAT LOSS IN BUILDINGS

-A FIRES HEAT

-SUN’S HEAT

 

  • MICROWAVES

-USED TO COOK FOOD

-KILLS ORGANISMS THAT SPOIL FOOD

-PORTIONS OF PHONE CALLS

 

  • SHORT RADIOWAVES

-CELL PHONES SIGNALS

-TV

 

  • LONG RADIO WAVES

-RADAR

-RADIO SIGNALS

-MARITIME COMMUNICATION

Diagram of a Wave Pg. 3

  1. EQUILIBRIUM
  2. AMPLITUDE
  3. WAVELENGTH
  4. TROUGH
  5. CREST
  6. WAVELENGTH
  7. TROUGH
  8. CREST
  9. AMPLITUDE
  10. EQUILIBRIUM

Vocabulary Activity Pg. 4

  1. Medium
  2. Refraction
  3. Wave
  4. Resonance
  5. Trough
  6. Frequency
  7. Interference
  8. Vibration
  9. Surface Wave
  10. Sound
  11. Electromagnetic Spectrum Energy Waves
  12. Transverse
  13. Wavelength
  14. Amplitude
  15. Standing Waves
  16. Crest
  17. Wave Speed
  18. Difraction
  19. Prism

 

 

 

 

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Unit 10 Summary p. 548

1) Algae that live in Florida coral reefs use energy from the sun to produce food for the coral.  Energy is transferred from the sun to the algae to the coral.

2) Yes, living things like a lions may compete for water and shelter.

3) Florida Black Bears eat berries from the plants in Florida’s forests.

4) Introduced species like the Burmese python in the Florida Everglades are better competitors for resources than the native species because they do not have natural predators in their new environment.  Because of that, they eat many native species and are a limiting factors.

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Unit 10 Lesson 4 Review p. 545

  1. Native species
  2. Wetland
  3. Coral reef
  4. Limiting factor
  5. The limiting factor for this population is that there is not enough food to support the number of birds in the population.
  6. Introduced species like the Burmese python in the Florida Everglades are better competitors for resources than the native species because they do no have natural predators in their new environment.  Because of that, they eat many native species and are a limiting factor.
  7. Estuaries are good places for fish to lay eggs because they provide great protection from predators, have abundant food and their warm and calm waters provide an ideal location for fish to reproduce.
  8. Gopher Tortoise, Turkey Vulture and the Sandhill Crane in the Land O’ Lakes ecosystem have a limiting factor due to human land development destroying their habitat.
  9. The number of crabs limits the gull population.  When crab population increases, so does the gull population.  When the crab population decreases, so does the gull population.
  10. Based on the evidence from the graph that a factor of 10 did not affect the gull population when the nest sites decreased 10 times from 1,000 nest sites to 100, I predict that their would be no effect to the gull population if the nest sites went from 100 to 10.
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Unit 10 Lesson 3 Review p. 531

  1. Predator
  2. Symbiotic
  3. Competition
  4. Commensalism
  5. Mutualism
  6. Two resources that an alligator would compete for in it’s ecosystem are food and land/soil.  The alligator had the adaptation of being amphibious, which allows them to be capable of competing for these resources in land and water.
  7. When the predator population goes up, the prey population goes down. When the prey population goes up, the predator population goes up.
  8. Point B would have the most amount of competition between the predators because the number of prey is far less than the number of predators.
  9. When competition increases for mates in an alligator population, the number of available mates for the alligator decreases.
  10. When a hawk kills and eats a squirrel in my community that is an example of predation.
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Unit 10 Lesson 2 Review p. 521

  1. The sun
  2. Decomposer
  3. Food web
  4. Photosynthesis
  5. Producers = Make the Food, Consumers eat producers and other consumers, and Decomposers eat the dead matter and waste in the ecosystem.
  6. Base = Plants/Producers, Middle = Herbivores, Carnivores, Omnivores/1st, 2nd and 3rd Level Consumers, Top = Tertiary Consumer as well as Decomposers
  7. The two types of global food webs are land food webs and water food webs.  They are connected by the water.
  8. Tree = Producer, Caterpillar = Consumer/Herbivore and Cardinal = Consumer/Omnivore
  9. The transfer of energy in the food chain.
  10. Wastes and the remains of dead things pile up.  The nutrients from the waste and dead things wouldn’t be released back into the ecosystem’s soil and so the producers would not have enough nutrients.
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Unit 10 Lesson 1 Review p. 507

  1. Abiotic factors are the nonliving part of an environment, such as water, soil, air, sunlight, etc… while biotic factors are the living part of the environment.
  2. The study of everything in an ecosystem.
  3. Habitat is where an organism lives in their ecosystem, and their niche is their role/job that they play in that ecosystem.
  4. Some ways that living things are connected to their nonliving environment are by the soil that they live on, the air that they breathe and the water that they drink.
  5. Individual Species – Populations – Communities – Ecosystems
  6. Populations depend on each other as they compete with each other for food, shelter and mates.
  7. Abiotic Factors determine where organisms can survive in a place.
  8. 25 – 14 = 11 degrees C
  9. If a draught occurred in a rainforest, the plants and animals populations would decrease because they depend on that rainfall to live and survive in that ecosystem.
  10. Owls and hawks can coexist in the same habitat as they both hunt for rodents because Owls hunt during the night, while hawks hunt during the day.
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Updated Table of Contents for the Science Binder

Pg # Assignment Grade
1 TABLE OF CONTENTS /10
2 SCIENCE SYLLABUS /100
3 ASSESSMENT DATA TABLE /10
4 B.O.T.Y. TEST /4
5 GETTING TO KNOW YOU SUPERHERO POSTER /100
6 LAB SAFETY NOTES /10
7 LAB SAFETY POSTER /100
8 LAB SAFETY TEST /100
9 Nature of Science Learning Goal and Scale for Unit 1 /25
10 Mythbusters Scientific Method Graphic Organizer /50
11 Unit 1 Textbook Guided Notes Worksheet /25
12 Unit 1 Benchmark Review ?’s #’s 1-12 /25
13 Simpsons’ Hypothesis and Identify Variables WS /40
14 Theories vs. Laws Reading Activity /100
15 Unit 1 Vocabulary Foldables /100
16 Paper Airplane Lab Report, Data Table and Graphs /200
17 Unit 4 Vocabulary Foldables /100
18 Unit 10 Vocabulary Foldables /100
19 Unit 10 Lesson Review’s Worksheet /160

SCIENCE BINDER CHECK ON FRIDAY, 11/3/17

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Science Fair-Periods 5 & 6

  1. STATEMENT OF PROBLEM-What is the problem or “question” you will investigate?
  2. RESEARCH-List books, articles, web sites, persons, or any other reference you used as sources of information about your project in MLA Format using.  You must have a minimum of 5 Research Sources.  Use:http://www.citationmachine.net
  3. WORKING HYPOTHESIS-What cause and effect relationship will your experiment test? This should be stated as an      If…then…because statement.
  4. PROCEDURES-How will your experiment be conducted?  List all of the steps
  5. Independent Variable-The variable that I will test in my experiment will be:
  6. Dependent Variable-The variable that will show an effect in my experiment will be:
  7. The Materials/Control/Constant Variables in my experiment are:
  8. DATA-Use graphs and data tables to visually display your data that was collected.
  9. CONCLUSION-Please provide a 2-3 paragraph summary about how your results supported or did not support your hypothesis.
  10. ABSTRACT-Please provide a 4-5 paragraph summary of your project.
  11. YOU WILL NEED A HANDWRITTEN JOURNAL.  EVERY DAY THAT YOU WORK ON THE PROJECT WRITE THE DATE IN THE JOURNAL AND A BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF WHAT YOU DID FOR YOUR SCIENCE FAIR PROJECT ON THAT DATE.

THE SCIENCE FAIR PROJECT IS DUE ON 11/15/2017

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Unit 1 Test Review-Unit 1 Summary p. 44

  1. As scientists make observations and conduct experiments, their answers to some questions may change.  Changes in understanding can lead to changes in scientific knowledge.  Over time, ideas and explanations change based on new observations and experimental results.

2. Tables help to organize data in an orderly way.  Graphs are helpful in analyzing data for patterns and trends.  Graphs also show data in a visual way.

3. Science is the study of the natural world.  Scientists ask questions, make observations, and gather empirical evidence to better understand the natural world in a systematic way.

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Unit 1 Test Review-Lesson 3 Review pg. 41

1. graph

2. model

3. A model is a physical or mathematical representation of a system, process or other thing.

4. Scientists use models to represent things that are too big, too small, or too complicated to observe or to use in an experiment.

5. Scientists use data tables to organize and record data.

6. A graph that is used to show how a set of data is divided into parts.

7. No, you would need a graph that shows two variables, such as a line graph.

8. The model is similar to the real object in terms of structure and the relative sizes of different parts of the building.  The model also shows the location of the windows.

9. This model shows what features this building would have and the relationship of these feature to one another without having to build the actual building.

10. A model might be too simple to explain how complex a system or process really is, so it wouldn’t actually help people understand what it represents.

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Unit 1 Test Review-Lesson 2 Review pg. 31

1. hypothesis

2. independent variable

3. data

4. It must be testable.

5. Experiments are most often performed in laboratories because it allows scientists to control variables more than in field investigations.

6. Repetition occurs when a scientist repeats her own experiment.  Replication occurs when others follow the scientists procedure to perform the experiment.

7. Defining a problem, forming a hypothesis, making predictions, planning an investigation collecting data, organizing dat, identifying variables, interpreting data, analyzing data, drawing conclusions.

8. The animal in the fossil had wings, a long tail and four legs.

9. The fossilized organism dates back to the time of the dinosaurs.

10. Test the hypothesis by experimenting with the rock that is found around the fossil and then collect the data about the components of the rock.

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Unit 1 Test Review-Lesson 1 Review pg. 15

1. theory

2. empirical evidence

3. law

4. Biology, Geology and Physical Science

5.  We commonly use theories when we mean a hunch or a guess, but in science that is not true.  In science theories are well tested and based on data from those experiments.

6. Laws are proven factual descriptions of what we see happening in the world.  Theories are well tested fact based explanations for how things happen in the world, but they have not been proven.

7. In the field and in the lab.

8. In a laboratory, scientists do experiments and control conditions.

9. It is a law because it is a statement that describes what is happening in the world and it is not an explanation about the reasons it is happening.

10. Scientific knowledge is often changed and modified as new evidence is found or new explanations are put forward for old evidence.

11. They hold these meetings and publish the discussion so scientists can debate scientific knowledge.  Scientists know debate is important for scientific knowledge to advance.

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Unit 1-Nature of Science Essential Questions

Updated on 9/6/2017

All 4 Questions Summary Notes:

  • What are the benefits and limitations of using scientific models?
  • How do scientists conduct a scientific experiment using all the parts of the scientific method?
  • How are qualitative and quantitative data alike and different?
  • How do the Mythbusters use empirical evidence and creative thinking in their science experiments?

Unit-1-Nature-of-Science-Essential-Questions-